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Archive for July 2019

Sports Injury Prevention for Your Child

Sports season is just around the corner with football about to kickoff and back-to-school shopping in full swing. If your child is ready to play in any school sports, then it is helpful to understand some key prevention techniques that help lower the risk of sports injuries.

Millions of younger children and adolescents each year experience sports injuries throughout the year, which can cause a great deal of pain and interrupt their season. But the good news is that sports injuries are highly preventable if parents, coaches, and training staff apply the following skills and knowledge to student athletes:

Tech your child safety skills and proper defensive techniques on the field

Especially if your child is participating in any contact sport, teaching your kids how to safely defend themselves is an effective means for preventing injuries.

Skills such as learning how to make proper contact, fall safely, and stay alert during play are very helpful in making sure that they are not as injury-prone during play. Talk with your child’s coaches to see if there is anything else they can do avoid injuries during play.

Have your child stretch and warm up before the game to help resist injuries.

Stretching is one of the best ways to resist and prevent injuries for athletes of all ages. That is because stretching can increase flexibility, pliability, and other important muscle traits. Most athletic trainers recommend stretching or warming up at least 15 minutes before their game or match begins.

Getting in a light warm up also helps to get any other muscles limber and your body ready to compete for an extended duration of time. Without proper warm ups or stretching your child is more likely to pull a muscle or experience a sprain.

Get your child a sports physical ASAP to identify injury risks and begin the sports season!

Most public and private schools require students to get a sport or camp physical whenever they want to enroll in a recreational program or sports season. But did you know that a sport physical also helps to prevent injuries or unexpected medical events during the year?

A sports physical helps coaches, medical staff, and trainers identify potential injury risks for your child. If your child has any health concerns, then your child’s coaches and athletic personnel can help to create the safest athletic environment for your child!

Know first-aid basics and take your child to urgent care for a sports injury

First-aid basics such as bandaging wounds, disinfecting lacerations, and stabilizing sprains can help reduce pain or the severity of injuries before proper medical treatment. Community organizations such as police and fire departments usually provide first-aid training courses if you want to get a full certification.

However, if your child does experience an injury and you don’t know first aid, then make sure to flag down the appropriate medical/athletic trainer before taking them to a nearby urgent care center. Urgent care is a more convenient option for non-emergency injuries such as bruises, bone brakes, and lacerations.

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How can Drivers Prepare for their DOT Physicals?

A Department of Transportation (DOT) physical is required in order for a commercial truck driver, or a similar vehicle operator, to effectively renew their commercial driver’s license. Without approval from a medical examiner or doctor, drivers may experience significant delays in their driving career.

However, it is fairly easy to prepare for the DOT physical by taking a few necessary precautions before the test. Effective preparedness can help ensure that you pass your physical and that you won’t have to retake the exam under other circumstances. So what should drivers do in order to prepare for their DOT physicals?

Avoid heavy meals and caffeinated beverages before the exam

Whenever you begin your DOT physical, it is important to avoid heavy meals and caffeine. This is because increased food consumption and caffeine may provide a false positive for high blood pressure and other conditions that inhibit your exam.

For example, caffeine can raise blood pressure for a short period of time and may lead to a slight increase during your exam. Try and avoid that extra cup of morning coffee before the exam. Additionally, foods high in cholesterol, sugar, and fat could provide false positives for other chronic diseases.

Before your exam, take the time to eat a light breakfast that is low-fat, low-sugar, and low in caffeine. Additionally, high-salt and sodium-filled foods could raise blood pressure in the short term.

Rest and relax before your exam

Stress can contribute to high blood pressure and other chronic disease in the same way frequent consumption of unhealthy foods can. Before your DOT physical, take some time to relax and de-stress.

Use a personal day when possible to find a time that works best for you to complete the exam. Don’t try to cram it on top of your other commitments. If you need to get you exam ASAP, try visiting a medical provide that provides walk-in clinic access.

Other techniques to help you relax include getting eight or more hours of sleep, deep breathing, mediation, and other mindfulness-based activities.

Bring in all your current medical paperwork

Medical information is key to ensure that you pass your DOT physical. If you have certain health conditions that are under control, you can get exemptions for DOT requirements if you show that you’re maintaining healthy control. These include treatable medical conditions with your current prescriptions, vision aids like contacts/glasses, health activities, and similar information.

Any medical information allows your medical examiner to provide the most up-to-date picture of your health and ensure that you aren’t flagged for a false reading of an emerging chronic health condition. Take all of these tips and put them into action before your next physical to ensure your trucking career doesn’t skip a beat!

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