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Archive for March 2019

Diabetes Awareness

Diabetes is a common disease that affects many American’s every year, but the general public still lacks basic and knowledge and understanding of the condition. Being aware of diabetes signs and symptoms can help you recognize the possibility of diabetes in yourself or a loved one. Even if none of the symptoms apply to you personally, having an understanding of the disease will help you as you come in contact with other diabetes sufferers throughout your life.

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses and responds to sugar or glucose. Glucose is a vital part of our bodies functions daily. From providing energy to our muscles to fueling our brain activity, we can’t survive without glucose. Diabetes causes too much glucose to enter the bloodstream at a time, which can have hazardous side effects. Diabetes can occur in type 1 or type 2, as well as prediabetes and gestational diabetes. Prediabetes and gestational diabetes can typically be resolved with healthy lifestyle changes and consistent monitoring.

Symptoms

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes both present with the same symptoms. The critical difference, however, is that type 1 diabetics typically notice the onset of symptoms much more quickly than type 2 diabetics. This leads to type 2 diabetics going undiagnosed and untreated for an extended period of time. Warning signs and potential symptoms of diabetes include:
• Excessive thirst
• Frequent urination
• Unexplained rapid weight loss
• Irritability
• Fatigue
• Recurrent infections
• Slow healing times on wounds and abrasions
• Blurred vision
• Ketones in urine samples
All of these symptoms are caused by the excess glucose in the blood combined with a lack of insulin to control the glucose. Type 1 diabetics often begin to show signs in early childhood. Their parents will likely notice signs before the children themselves do. Type 2 diabetes appears in adults over the age of 40 the most, but it can technically begin at any age. Prediabetes looks in someone at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If prediabetes is diagnosed, your doctor will prescribe lifestyle changes involving your diet and exercise to reverse the effects before you become a type 2 diabetic. Gestational diabetes appears in women during pregnancy and typically goes away after the pregnancy ends. Lifestyle changes and monitoring can often control gestational diabetes without the need for supplemental insulin injections in the expectant mother.
If you think you or a loved one may be suffering from diabetes, contact a doctor right away to begin the testing process.

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Debunking Common Women’s Health Myths

From a young age, most women are given health advice from their fellow female friends and family members. While some of that advice may be wise, much of it is based on false myths. Following those myths can actually lead to more harm than good! If you aren’t sure what’s right and what’s false anymore, we’re here to help.


Bras Cause Cancer

There is an old myth that bras cause breast cancer. While they may be uncomfortable and at times annoying, they don’t have any direct link to breast cancer. Unhealthy eating and consuming alcohol are linked to increased risk of breast cancer, but regular mammogram screenings can help you stay protected. Perform a self-breast exam once per month to look for any lumps or signs of change. After the age of 45, you should get a mammogram once per year.


Certain Foods Improve Fertility


Trying to conceive without success can be frustrating. It leaves many women grasping at straws for anything that can improve their chances of conceiving. A commonly heard myth is that certain foods, including yams and soy, make getting pregnant easier. These claims are totally false and backed by no scientific evidence. If you find yourself struggling to conceive, speak with your gynecologist to discuss your fertility options.


A Low Sex Drive is Bad


Many women worry that their lack of interest in sex signals that something is wrong. The truth is, some women just have a lower sex drive! With age and other lifestyle changes, it’s normal for your sex drive to change. You should only be concerned if you notice a sudden drop in libido compared to where it usually is. In this instance, talk with your doctor to discuss what may be causing the change. Stress, hormone imbalance, dietary changes, and many other factors could be causing the change. It may take some patience and exploration to get your sex drive back to where it once was, and that’s okay! Remember, you should never compare your sex drive to that of your friends or family members. Every woman is different, and there’s no right or wrong level of libido to have. Forcing yourself to engage in sex when the interest isn’t present can actually harm your sex drive in the future. Be open with your partner about your needs and explore options to improve your sex drive if you feel the need.




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